Last edited by Nikot
Wednesday, July 8, 2020 | History

2 edition of The pillow book of Sei Shonagon found in the catalog.

The pillow book of Sei Shonagon

Sei ShЕЌnagon

The pillow book of Sei Shonagon

the diary of a 10th century courtesan of Heian Japan

by Sei ShЕЌnagon

  • 26 Want to read
  • 30 Currently reading

Published by Tuttle Pub. in Tokyo, Rutland, Vt .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references.

Statementtranslated by Arthur Waley ; with a foreword by Dennis Washburn
ContributionsWaley, Arthur
Classifications
LC ClassificationsPL788.6.M3 E56 2011
The Physical Object
Paginationp. cm.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL24438458M
ISBN 109784805311080
LC Control Number2010026057
OCLC/WorldCa645708256

  The Pillow Book of Sei Shonagon was a product of a tenth-century courtier's experiences in the palace of Empress Teishi. A common custom of the time period, courtiers used to keep notes or a diary in a wooden pillow with a drawer. This "pillow book" reflects the confident aesthetic judgments of Shonagon and her ability to create prose that 4/5(K). The Pillow Book, written about , is a collection of impressions of court life by the court lady Sei Shônagon.A contemporary of Murasaki Shikibu, who wrote The Tale of Genji, Sei Shônagon reflects the same concern with style and taste typical of the the wistful and sometimes tragic mood of The Tale of Genji, however, the author of The Pillow Book .

  The Pillow Book by Sei Shonagon is of salient discussion given the case that it presents various segments that would help one to analyze her as woman. The ground to present such ideology is that ma y of the women within the ancient centuries were denied various rights since many of the men were opposed to the perspective of according rights to. The Pillow Book is a book of observations and musings recorded by Sei Shonagon during her time as court lady to Empress Consort Teishi during the s and early 11th century in Heian Japan. The book was completed in the year

  The Pillow Book (),Peter Greenaway Sei Shonagon (book) [email protected] The Pillow Book of Sei Shonagon is an immensely detailed account of court life in eleventh-century Japan. Written at the height of Heian culture, it is a classic text of great literary beauty, full of lively anecdotes, humorous observations, and subtle impressions. Sei Shonagon was a contemporary and erstwhile rival of Lady Murasaki, whose novel, The Tale of Genji, /5(4).


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The pillow book of Sei Shonagon by Sei ShЕЌnagon Download PDF EPUB FB2

"The Pillow Book of Sei Shonagon" is a fascinating, detailed account of Japanese court life in the eleventh century. Written by a lady of the court at the height of Heian culture, this book enthralls with its lively gossip, witty observations, and subtle by: 9.

The Pillow Book of Sei Shonagon is a fascinating look at Japanese court culture during the 11th century Heian period ( to ).

While others may be more familiar with Murasaki Shikibu’s The Tale of Genji as an example of classic Japanese literature of the time, I chose The Pillow Book instead – I always lean towards bucking the trend and I was intrigued Cited by: 9.

The Pillow Book of Sei Shonagon is a fascinating, detailed account of Japanese court life in the eleventh century.

Written by a lady of the court at the height of Heian culture, this book enthralls with its lively gossip, witty observations, and subtle impressions/5(46).

The Pillow Book is a collection of reflections written by Japanese gentlewoman Sei Shonagon as a kind of journal during the s and early s. Though her world would have been familiar to her audience, which experienced her reflections only after they were unintentionally released, parts of The Pillow Book may seem opaque to 21st-century.

The Pillow Book of Sei Shonagon is a fascinating look at Japanese court culture during the 11th century Heian period ( to ). While others may be more familiar with Murasaki Shikibu’s The Tale of Genji as an example of classic Japanese literature of the time, I chose The Pillow Book instead – I always lean towards bucking the trend and I was intrigued /5(66).

Sei Shōnagon (/) was a Japanese author and a court lady who served the Empress Consort Teishi around the year She is known as the author of The Pillow Book (makura no sōshi). This article on an author is a stub. The Pillow Book of Sei Shonagon is a fascinating, detailed account of Japanese court life in the eleventh century.

Written by a lady of the court at the height of Heian culture, this book enthralls with its lively gossip, witty observations, and subtle impressions.

The Pillow Book is an extreme example of a work that has lived past its time, and attained the deathless status that writers dream of as they labour over their page or screen, transmuting their moment into moment-transcending language.

Sei Shônagon, who may well have allowed herself such a dream from time to time as her brush moved over the page, despite the. The Pillow Book, on the other hand, is a plain record of fact, and being at least ten times as long as Murasaki's Diary, and far more varied in contents, it is the most important document of the period that we possess.

Sei Shonagon, the author of The Pillow Book, was born in orthe daughter of Kiyohara no Motosuke. The Kiyohara clan /5(14). The Pillow Book (Makura no Soshi) is a personalised account of life at the Japanese court by Sei Shonagon which she completed c. CE during the Heian book is full of humorous observations (okashi) written in the style of a diary, an approach known as zuihitsu-style (‘rambling') of which The Pillow Book was the first and greatest example.

The Pillow Book is a diary composed by Sei Shōnagon, a young woman who served in the imperial court at Kyoto during Japan’s Heian period. Specifically, Sei was a gentlewoman in the service of the Empress Teishi, from roughly the year until C.E. Sei herself was born in an outlying province where her father served as a governor.

― Sei Shonagon, The Pillow Book. 13 likes. Like “It was a clear, moonlit night a little after the tenth of the Eighth Month. Her Majesty, who was residing in the Empress's Office, sat by the edge of the veranda while Ukon no Naishi played the flute for her.

The other ladies in attendance sat together, talking and laughing; but I stayed by. The Pillow Book of Sei Shonagon is a fascinating, detailed account of Japanese court life in the eleventh century.

Written by a lady of the court at the height of Heian culture, this book enthralls with its lively gossip, witty observations, and subtle :   The Pillow Book, by Sei Shonagon I finally got around to reading this diary about courtly life in Heian era (right about the year ) Japan.

I’ve been meaning to give it a go ever since my friend Becca blogged about it (wow, that was three years ago). Find the quotes you need in Sei Shonagon's The Pillow Book, sortable by theme, character, or section. From the creators of SparkNotes. About The Pillow Book. The classic portrayal of court life in tenth-century Japan Written by the court gentlewoman Sei Shonagon, ostensibly for her own amusement, The Pillow Book offers a fascinating exploration of life among the nobility at the height of the Heian period, describing the exquisite pleasures of a confined world in which poetry, love, fashion, and whim dominated.

Introduction Sei Shonagon’s Pillow Book (Makura no Soshi) is the private journal of a lady-in-waiting to the Empress of Japan written during the ’s.

Sei served her empress during the late Heian Period (a particularly vibrant time for Japanese arts and the beginning of Japan’s feudal age) and was a contemporary ofFile Size: KB. Sei Shōnagon, diarist, poet, and courtier whose witty, learned Pillow Book (Makura no sōshi) exhibits a brilliant and original Japanese prose style and is a masterpiece of classical Japanese literature.

It is also the best source of information on Japanese court. Sei Shonagon’s The Pillow Book is one of the strangest and most delightful works of literature in the entire human history. Shonagon () was a Lady-In-Waiting serving the Japanese empress Sadako in the peaceful Heian era.

The Pillow Book by Sei Shonagon,available at Book Depository with free delivery worldwide.4/5(K). The pillow book of Sei Shonagon Item Preview remove-circle Share or Embed This Item. EMBED. EMBED (for hosted blogs and item tags) Want more?

Advanced embedding details, examples, and help! No_Favorite. share Pages: Sei Shōnagon (清少納言, c. – or ) was a Japanese author, poet, and a court lady who served the Empress Teishi (Sadako) around the year during the middle Heian is the author of The Pillow Book (枕草子, makura no sōshiOccupation: Lady-in-waiting to Empress Teishi.

The Pillow Book by Sei Shonagon is a very old diary/journal of a woman in court life in ancient Japan. The translation with all the helpful hints by Ivan Morris is excellent - I was never at a loss to what was happening. With Ivan's help Sei brings back to life years ago in Japan.

Her writings are her observations to life around by: 9.